Greek celebration days

//Greek celebration days
Greek celebration days 2017-10-10T05:26:30+00:00

Greek celebration days

The Greeks love to celebrate and as on most of the Greek celebration days, all shops and public services are closed, it is handy to know the dates and the happenings of the main Greek celebration days.

National celebration days in Greece

Here, we have collected some information about the main Greek National Celebration Days that are based on major historical events of Greece.

On the 25th March (of the year 1821): Today is the Greek Independence Day. Military parades take place all over the country, students, police, army and port police officers march wearing the colors of the Greek flag. This is the date that the Greeks celebrate the day they declared the Revolutionary War against the Turks, on March 25th, 1821. It is an interesting site to watch!

On the 1st May, is Greek Labor Day: This celebration day is called Protomagia (meaning the first day of May) and it is an urban holiday when people (mostly families) follow the Greek tradition and go to the countryside for a picnic. It is also a day when large demonstrations are organized by the left political parties.

On the 28th October, is the National Anniversary.  Today is characterized by the military parades that take place all over the country. Students, police, army and port police officers march in pride, wearing the colors of the Greek flag. It is also called “Ohi Day”, meaning Day of No, in honor to the negative response of the Greeks at the time when the Italians asked them to surrender during World War II, on October 28th, 1940. The Greeks fought for their mother’s country against the Italians and managed to win many battles, although the Greeks were fewer in number and did not have the very good military equipment. However, the coordinated attack of the German-Italian forces in April 1941 succumbed the Greek army.

The 17th November, The Polytechnic Uprise against the Junta The day of the student rise against the Greek Junta of 1974. On November 14th, students locked themselves in the Polytechnic School of Athens and protested for the Junta. Three days later, a tank invaded the School and killed many of them. Many demonstrations and parades take place on this date and public services do not operate.